Who am I?

The name's Job. Like Steve Jobs' last name without the "S". I like technology, both hardware and software. I'm into computers, mobile devices, and internet services. Yes, that includes apps. I love playing around with tech and discovering things other people don't even think about exploring. In short, I like going into the nitty-gritty of technology.

 

Did I study IT?

No. I have neither an education nor credentials relating to IT. But I do have a degree in molecular biology. This is about the nitty-gritty of life – cells, proteins, DNA, that sort of thing.

 

What do I do?

A lot of things. I do some tech support for an email marketing platform. I also do content writing and social media management for a business website. I also make videos and do voiceovers, both for work and as a hobby.

Do I work for different companies? No. I do all that work for just one company, and we're composed of a very small team of four.

 

Why am I not working in research?

Good question, and I get that a lot. I did work as a research assistant for my uni back in 2014, right after I graduated. The project assigned to me lasted only a year, though. And that was the year that made me realise how rubbish I was at doing research. At the end of it, I figured that I was not meant to be in a lab. I found it awfully draining at times, and I decided that enough was enough. Once this project ends, I'm done. Goodbye research career.

Not to mention the many horror stories I read of people with PhDs not having good tenure, or worse, not having jobs at all. There is story after story of PhDs and postgraduate degree holders not having a very satisfying life. Many have to work more than 80 hours a week with only minimal pay. They even sacrifice weekends and holidays, and some of them barely have any family time. It's almost as if they were getting sucked into a black hole of academia. Adding insult to injury is the fact that there is little recourse for them when faced with the many stresses of the research life.

Reading those stories made me re-evaluate my career path. Surely I was not willing to resign myself to that kind of life. Which is why I left.

 

Am I satisfied with what I'm doing now?

Absolutely. I work from home with a flexible schedule – that alone is something big. I don't see a lot of people with that sort of freedom. Although I'm not earning as much as I was during my stint as a research assistant, I don't mind. I have time for my hobbies, and I'm in the midst of a very supportive and friendly boss. So it's all good!

 

Why put up a Tech blog?

I've always enjoyed helping people with their technology if something isn't working right for them. At home, I'm the Lead Tech Support for my parents (and I'm not complaining). I just have a penchant for tinkering with technology and exploring its inner workings. And what better way to use that skill than by sharing it with those who need it, yes? People like you!